Jeliza Patterson

Posts tagged woman artist

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nabokovsnotebook:

Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions was self-published in 1843 by botanist and photographer Anna Atkins. Atkins may have been the first woman to create a photograph and to publish a book with accompanying photographic illustrations. That makes her the first female photographer, folks. 

Cyanotype is a type of contact printing (invented by the interesting-in-his-own-right John Herschel for blueprint copying, and brought to photographic art by Atkins), and Atkins created her photograms of algae by placing dried specimens directly atop the paper for exposure. 

(via staceythinx)

Filed under cyanotype science woman artist algae botany

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cavetocanvas:

Ana Mendieta, Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973-77
From The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles:

Ana Mendieta was born into a politically prominent family in Cuba closely affiliated with the Communist movement led by Fidel Castro. When the alliance between Castro’s factions and Mendieta’s father turned sour in 1961, she was sent to live in the United States. Her exile informed the development of her ensuing work; she did not identify with a particular homeland and adopted various sites for her performances and their documentation. The untitled works that comprise the Silueta series, which she preformed as she traveled between Iowa and Mexico, reveal her interest in the earth as a site to address issues of displacement by recording the presence of her body—or the imprint it left behind—within different natural environments. Mendieta often filled in the silhouette of her body on the earth with various materials such as rocks, twigs, and flowers, as well as blood and gunpowder.

cavetocanvas:

Ana Mendieta, Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973-77

From The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles:

Ana Mendieta was born into a politically prominent family in Cuba closely affiliated with the Communist movement led by Fidel Castro. When the alliance between Castro’s factions and Mendieta’s father turned sour in 1961, she was sent to live in the United States. Her exile informed the development of her ensuing work; she did not identify with a particular homeland and adopted various sites for her performances and their documentation. The untitled works that comprise the Silueta series, which she preformed as she traveled between Iowa and Mexico, reveal her interest in the earth as a site to address issues of displacement by recording the presence of her body—or the imprint it left behind—within different natural environments. Mendieta often filled in the silhouette of her body on the earth with various materials such as rocks, twigs, and flowers, as well as blood and gunpowder.

Filed under Art art history silueta works ana mendieta earthworks conceptual art installation art latina woman artist

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The advantages of being a woman artist

  • Working without the pressure of success.
  • Not having to be in shows with men.
  • Having an escape from the art world in your four free-lance jobs.
  • Knowing your career might pick up after you’re eighty.
  • Being reassured that whatever kind of art you make it will be labeled feminine.
  • Not being stuck in a tenured teaching position.
  • Seeing your ideas live on in the work of others.
  • Having an opportunity to choose between career and motherhood.
  • Not having to smoke those big cigars or paint in Italian suits.
  • Having more time to work after your mate dumps you for someone younger.
  • Being included in revised versions of art history.
  • Not having to undergo the embarrassment of being called a genius.

 Guerrilla Girls, quoted in Whitney Chadwick Women, Art and Society

Filed under woman artist women artist guerilla girls feminism fine art