Jeliza Patterson

Posts tagged political art

10,726 notes

eaedwards:

Laurie Anderson.  

Anderson photographed men who called to her or whistled her on the street.  In her artist statement she writes about one experience:

“As I walked along Houston Street with my fully automated Nikon, I felt armed, ready. I passed a man who muttered ‘Wanna fuck?’ This was standard technique: the female passes and the male strikes at the last possible moment, forcing the woman to backtrack if she should dare to object.  I wheeled around, furious. ‘Did you say that?’ He looked around surprised, then defiant. ‘Yeah, so what the fuck if I did?’ I raised my Nikon, took aim, and began to focus.  His eyes darted back and forth, an undercover cop? CLICK.”

Anderson takes the power from her male pursuers, allowing them nothing more than the momentary fear that their depravity has just been captured in a picture.

(via glittt)

Filed under art photography street harrasment political art

46 notes

diresultan:

These posters can be seen all over the different Palestinian camps of Lebanon. The text reads الشعب يريد العودة إلى فلسطين which translates to: The people want to return to Palestine. The imagery is powerful and the black and white artistry adds to the emotions of the faces and flags. 

The artist’s name is Daniel Drennan and the posters were made as a part of the Return to Palestine Project. This link has more information about the project as well as more sizes and downloadable versions of all the posters he made. 

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Helvetica}

http://www.jamaalyad.org/MAIN/PRJT/PRJT_3AWDE/

(via ewige-blumenkraft-deactivated20)

Filed under Palestine Al 3awda the Return Poster Nakba Day political art

26,883 notes

emeraldtriangleprincess:

so there’s a lot of beautiful Rosie the Riveters out there, and I’ve compiled a set of them, so we can appreciate them all together :)

ps I don’t know the artists or women depicted for most of these, so if you have info, let me know and I’ll add it!

  1. original print (J. Howard Miller)
  2. Sabina England (artist and portrayal)
  3. unknown
  4. Kelly Rowland (portrayal); Derek Blanks (photographer)
  5. Guatelmalan Woman of Quetzalteca Especial (artist: Mario Lanz)
  6. unknown
  7. Roshan the Riveter (artist: Omid Hast)
  8. Latina Rosie the Riveter (artist: my-little-native)
  9. Robert Valadez (artist)
  10. unknown

(via daughterofmulan)

Filed under political art feminist art

173 notes

I only need 2,000 total signatures.

stfuprolife:

the-womanifesto:

Please spread this petition around.

Western Kentucky University: Support art student’s response to public pro-life display.

Hilltoppers for Life placed 4,000 crosses on bleachers on the Western Kentucky University campus to protest abortion. An art student who felt bombarded by the display responded by placing condoms on some of the crosses. The administration is now demanding that she apologize for her public response to a public display. Show support for this art student and tell WKU to allow freedom of speech for ALL people.

I really want to get through to my school administration that it is not ok to let one group speak out for what they believe and then try to punish another that is doing the same thing but with an opposite stance. WKU has been under fire before for freedom of speech. They got national attention earlier this year for new rules they were trying to create that would censor what students could say about WKU on social media. It was because of all of the national attention they received that they decided to back off. I want the same thing to happen here. It’s difficult to be pro-choice and fight for reproductive rights, especially here in the bible belt. Please help me and my fellow students make our administration actually LISTEN to us. Sign the petition and spread it. 

Signal boost.

Putting condoms on anti-choice displays deserves all the support. 

They’re even threatening to fail her based on this which goes against policy.  Here is a professor of that school’s response

(via bohemianarthouse)

Filed under political art

201 notes

azaadi:

I am Baghdad

I am often asked about my feelings regarding the war in Iraq. My response, inevitably, is reflective of my own experience growing up in Baghdad. I’m aware that other Iraqis hold different feelings based on their own backgrounds and socio-economical, religious and educational influences. In this series I attempt to convey those various feelings by placing myself in their shoes and walking their path.

I view the portraits as interviews, wherein Baghdad citizens express their feelings about post-occupation Iraq. The portraits are all tightly shot and so close-up that you have no choice but to listen to what they have to tell you. The faces are the same since they are united in nationality and under the same umbrella of circumstance. Yet each is representative of different slices of Baghdad’s social and political system.  

The layers of calligraphy that are imposed on the faces express the individual feelings of each person. It is up to you to interpret those feelings. 

Ayad Alkadhi

(via bidyke)

Filed under political art

133 notes

cavetocanvas:

Kara Walker, Insurrection! (Our Tools Were Rudimentary, Yet We Pressed On), 2000
From the Guggenheim:

In Insurrection! (Our Tools Were Rudimentary, Yet We Pressed On), Walker applied colored projections to her silhouette tableaux for the first time. The additional layer disallows passive voyeurism. As viewers step into the environment, their shadows join the sinister scene. Here a woman flees with a noose still hanging from her neck; there in the Big House, another woman’s rag-wrapped head tilts over a body that she disembowels with a ladle; outside, another young girl straddles a gentleman whose head she lifts off effortlessly. Walker dissects conditions of desperation, subjugation, and the decadence of power, staging fantastical confrontations with the illogic of human bondage.

cavetocanvas:

Kara Walker, Insurrection! (Our Tools Were Rudimentary, Yet We Pressed On), 2000

From the Guggenheim:

In Insurrection! (Our Tools Were Rudimentary, Yet We Pressed On), Walker applied colored projections to her silhouette tableaux for the first time. The additional layer disallows passive voyeurism. As viewers step into the environment, their shadows join the sinister scene. Here a woman flees with a noose still hanging from her neck; there in the Big House, another woman’s rag-wrapped head tilts over a body that she disembowels with a ladle; outside, another young girl straddles a gentleman whose head she lifts off effortlessly. Walker dissects conditions of desperation, subjugation, and the decadence of power, staging fantastical confrontations with the illogic of human bondage.

Filed under art art history kara walker insurrection our tools were rudimentary yet we pressed on political art