Jeliza Patterson

Posts tagged ocean

135 notes

dduane:

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)
The googly-eyed glass squid (Teuthowenia pellucida) is a rare, slightly blue and transparent deep-sea squid. It gets its name from its disproportionately large eyes. It has eight short tentacles and one slightly longer pair. Its internal digestive organs and the females eggs can be visible through its transparent body. It is able to engorge itself with surrounding water to dramatically increase in size, portraying a more intimidating appearance to potential predators. Like most squid, it can also escape predators using jet propulsion. The cells of its eyes and tentacles form small light-emitting organs (bioluminescent photophores). This array of small lights is used to mask the true identity of the googly-eyed squid to others in the dark. For more on glass squid, see this post.
(Source)

The ocean is so full of cool things, I can’t bear it sometimes.

dduane:

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)

The googly-eyed glass squid (Teuthowenia pellucida) is a rare, slightly blue and transparent deep-sea squid. It gets its name from its disproportionately large eyes. It has eight short tentacles and one slightly longer pair. Its internal digestive organs and the females eggs can be visible through its transparent body. It is able to engorge itself with surrounding water to dramatically increase in size, portraying a more intimidating appearance to potential predators. Like most squid, it can also escape predators using jet propulsion. The cells of its eyes and tentacles form small light-emitting organs (bioluminescent photophores). This array of small lights is used to mask the true identity of the googly-eyed squid to others in the dark. For more on glass squid, see this post.

(Source)

The ocean is so full of cool things, I can’t bear it sometimes.

Filed under ocean life

180 notes

rhamphotheca:

Transparent Pink Sea Cucumber
Census of Marine Life researchers discovered this unusual transparent sea cucumber (Enypniastes sp.) in the Gulf of Mexico. It creeps forward on its tentacles, sweeping detritus-rich sediment into its mouth. So far Census researchers have discovered more than 5,000 new species. They expect to find many more.
(via: Smithsonian Ocean Portal)      
(photo: Laurence Madin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/CMarZ, Census of Marine Life)

rhamphotheca:

Transparent Pink Sea Cucumber

Census of Marine Life researchers discovered this unusual transparent sea cucumber (Enypniastes sp.) in the Gulf of Mexico. It creeps forward on its tentacles, sweeping detritus-rich sediment into its mouth. So far Census researchers have discovered more than 5,000 new species. They expect to find many more.

(via: Smithsonian Ocean Portal)      

(photo: Laurence Madin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/CMarZ, Census of Marine Life)

Filed under sea cucumber echinoderm deep sea ocean

300 notes

dduane:

ichthyologist:

Marrus Orthocanna
A colonial animal composed of a complex arrangement of zooids, some of which are polyps and some medusae.

Wow, they look like a little alien spaceship taking off.  :)

But cooler — because really, Mother Nature keeps coming up with more extreme things than we see in even science fiction. :)

dduane:

ichthyologist:

Marrus Orthocanna

A colonial animal composed of a complex arrangement of zooids, some of which are polyps and some medusae.

Wow, they look like a little alien spaceship taking off.  :)

But cooler — because really, Mother Nature keeps coming up with more extreme things than we see in even science fiction. :)

Filed under cool ocean life

126 notes

rhamphotheca:

California’s New State Parks Will Get You All Wet 

A new series of marine parks creates an almost unbroken chain of protected ocean from Mexico to Oregon.

by Andrew Price

California just opened several new state parks, but you may need scuba gear to visit them. They’re underwater.

The new parks include a massive kelp forest off the coast of La Jolla, coral reefs around Catalina Island, and an underwater canyon near Malibu. In total, there are about three dozen new protected marine areas in Southern California where scuba diving, kayaking, and surfing are encouraged but fishing is either tightly restricted or prohibited altogether.

The boundaries of the parks were decided with input from thousands of stakeholders, including scientists, environmentalists, fishermen, and residents. The protected areas cover more than 350 square miles of the state’s most productive and diverse marine habitats.

These new parks, which became official on January 1st, are part of a vast network of ocean parks that was called for by the state’s 1999 Marine Life Protection Act. The first were established along California’s central coast in 2007 and 2010. The third and final section, in northern California, will be added in a year or so, completing a series of protected ocean areas that stretches from Oregon to Mexico…

(read more: Co.Exist)     (top image: Andray Armyagov)

Filed under north america ocean conservation

5,601 notes

laurendane:

archiemcphee:

“Haenyo – The Indomitable Diving Grandmas of Jeju Island”

They call themselves haenyo (pronounced hen-yuh), which literally means sea women and the whistling sound they made preceding their exit from the depths is called sumbisori. They are representative of a centuries old tradition, one which transformed their island in to a functioning matriarchy but a way of life which today is in danger of disappearing forever.

The island of Jeju, 53 miles south of mainland Korea, lies at the watery crossroads of the Yellow and East China Seas. Diving for conch, octopus, urchin, and abalone had always taken place there but due to large taxes was never very profitable – something men would take up if there was no alternative. That was until a canny group of women in the 18th century realized that women did not, unlike their men folk, have to pay taxes. A loophole was about to become a living.

The haenyo (sometimes spelled haenyeo) do not use oxygen tanks, which would only weigh them down and make their difficult task even harder. Their black wet suits and goggles are all they need to descend to the sea floor to collect their bounty. The skills they possess serve them well now – and did so too under the Japanese occupation of the Second World War. Many haenyo became heroines of the Korean resistance movement.

Learn more about these awesome women over at Kuriositas!

Photos by DMac 5D Mark II and Baraka50

[via The Presurfer]

wow, amazing women

(via laurendane-deactivated20120720)

Filed under women korea tentacles octopus ocean