Jeliza Patterson

61,302 notes

we-are-star-stuff:

This is maybe one of the greatest wild life phenomenon on the planet ever captured on lens!
In the sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, a massive congregation of Munkiana Devil Rays, relative of manta rays, was captured by a German photographer Florian Schulz, displaying unusual event which he dubbed as the Flight of the Rays.
But as this wonderful perspective shows, for all the individuals leaping out that are visible at sea level, there are many more below the surface. The jaw-dropping image below shows only a quarter of the whole scene.
No one knows why the rays gather like this, whether to mate, herd prey or migrate or just for the sheer joy of being together.

we-are-star-stuff:

This is maybe one of the greatest wild life phenomenon on the planet ever captured on lens!

In the sea of Cortez, Baja California, Mexico, a massive congregation of Munkiana Devil Rays, relative of manta rays, was captured by a German photographer Florian Schulz, displaying unusual event which he dubbed as the Flight of the Rays.

But as this wonderful perspective shows, for all the individuals leaping out that are visible at sea level, there are many more below the surface. The jaw-dropping image below shows only a quarter of the whole scene.

No one knows why the rays gather like this, whether to mate, herd prey or migrate or just for the sheer joy of being together.

(via crotchetybushtit)

1,215 notes

5centsapound:

Disarming Design from Palestine


Disarming Design from Palestine is an inclusive design label that presents functional products from Palestine, that provide an alternative narrative from what you might usually find in the high street. The collection includes objects such as hourglasses that use cement from the separation wall, a dress made out of one keffiyeh, embroidered car decorations, scarfs depicting landscapes, olive leaves as earrings and an impossible chess game with water tanks and watch towers. The growing collection of products is presented on-line and through a traveling exhibition.* As a collection it aims to represent Palestinian culture in its current reality and reflect upon the function of art in situations of conflict.
The goods are developed, designed and produced by contemporary designers, artists and students in collaboration with local artisans and producers. During several ‘create-shops’ they engage in an enriching design dialogue with small emerging businesses and international colleagues. The project aims to catalyze the development of design as a discourse in Palestine.

(via crotchetybushtit)

3,292 notes

How to help out your favorite artists when you don’t have any money

katedrawscomics:

3liza:

I post something like this about once a year, because I get a lot of messages from people who enjoy my art but feel guilty about not buying things from my store or subscribing on Patreon or getting things from my wishlist, etc. You really don’t need to do ANY of those things to help us out! Eyeballs on artwork is what we want, and just that is really helpful. But there are lots of other, free things you can do, if you want to, that will help us.

  • You can reblog our work, with credit! Tumblr, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, showing people next to you in class or at the library, whatever. The more you reblog our stuff, any kind of stuff, and especially if it has a name and/or link attached, the more followers we get, the happier we are, and the easier we can sell art and pay rent. This is such a vital part of our continued existence and it is difficult to overstate how grateful we are when it happens.

  • You can like, comment, subscribe on Youtube, reply on Twitter, and generally make our little numbers go up. Even if you don’t want a drawing on your blog, hitting “Like” helps. If people are browsing your liked posts (if you have this option available in your sidebar or in a separate page) they will see our work. Additionally, higher note counts translate instantly to “more worthy of being looked at” when parsed by an idle, browsing brain. That’s the price of being a member of a social species, and it stinks because it doesn’t reflect “quality” or “innate value” of art, whatever that is, but a post with 4 digit notes is going to get more positive regard than a post with a 2 digit notecount. And really, it makes sense. If lots of people like a thing, it is likely, if only statistically, that you will too. 

  • You can talk about your favorite artists to your friends. A lot of us idle on skype and irc all day, talking about new album releases and games and twitter beef. It doesn’t occur to a lot of us to talk about how so-and-so just did a cartoon of a fat bird that is making our day slightly better, but that URL pastes just as easily into the chat as any other. Don’t be annoying about it, but like Homeland Security always says, if you see something, say something!

  • You can look at/click the ads on our websites. You can disable AdBlock on our websites, too. I have two little Project Wonderful boxes at the top of my blog. They pay me very little per day, but when I need $20 to stop an overdraft fee or buy a food, Project Wonderful has my back. This has happened about a dozen times, enough to teach me the value of having that last, tiny bit of cash just slowly snowballing in the background.

There is probably other stuff that I’m forgetting, so please feel free to reblog and add them.

also personally I am nuts about getting comments on the site because people talking about the comic is the actual BEST

(via rosalarian)

1,982 notes

medievalpoc:

bilt2tumble:

medievalpoc:

Studio of Francis Harwood (in Italy)

Portrait Bust of a Black Man

England, Italy (1758)

Black Stone and Yellow Siena Marble, 2 ft. 3 1/2 in. x 1 ft. 7 3/4 in. x 10 1/2 in.

Info via Getty Museum:

With noble bearing, this man proudly holds his chin high above his powerful chest. Sculptor Francis Harwood chose a black stone to reproduce the sitter’s skin tone. Harwood also chose an unusual antique format for the bust, terminating it in a wide arc below the man’s pectoral muscles. Harwood was familiar with antique sculptures from time spent in Florence reproducing and copying them. He may have deliberately used this elegant, rounded termination, which includes the entire, unclothed chest and shoulders, to evoke associations with ancient busts of notable men. Although the identity of the sitter is unknown, the scar on his face suggests that this is a portrait of a specific individual. This work may be one of the earliest sculpted portraits of a Black individual by a European.*

* I think we should all know by now that this is definitely untrue.

PDF with information for educators from the Getty Museum

…And the fact that the last line (struck out above) was included AT ALL is telling. Details folks. DETAILS.

Nearly every work featuring a “Black individual” in European art has the same claim written by the museum writer/curator. 

I hope this post clears up any confusion about that.